Saturday, September 30, 2017

My 19th Century Immigrant Ancestors

Over the decades, of course I've found plenty of information regarding my Mayflower, Anne and Great Migration immigrant ancestors. But mysteries remain when it comes to my 19th century immigrant ancestors, especially those from Ireland. I thought I would take a look and start working up timelines on my ancestors who immigrated to the United States between 1800 and 1900.

I'll start with the most recent ones and work my way back.

Italy


Bartolomeo Giovanni Michele Galfre and his wife, Ernesta Maddalena Bergamasco, emigrated separately from Italy to the United States.

Great-great grandpa Galfre was born 22 January 1869 in San Beningo, Torino, Italy. His brother's descendants, my cousins, now live in Busca, Cuneo. Bartolomeo immigrated in 1897 via Ellis Island.

Great-great grandma Ernesta was born 12 May 1875, possibly in Moneglia. They were married in 1894 and lived in San Remo at first. She followed Grandpa Galfre to the U.S. around 1899 or so. They settled in Middleborough, Massachusetts.

We know quite a bit about their lives, though Ernesta's family still remains a little bit of a mystery for us.

England


My 19th Century Immigrant Ancestors
SS Germanic
Thomas Wood and Sarah Ann Gray are my third great-grandparents. Thomas was born about 1845 in the Ancoats district of Manchester, England. He was baptized in 1851 in St. Philip's.

Sarah Ann Gray was born in 1848 in Manchester, and she and Thomas were married 18 July 1869, per the marriage record from the General Register Office.

It seems Thomas and Sarah had fairly normal lives in England. I'm not sure what brought them to Connecticut on the Germanic in 1878, along with my great-great grandfather John (born 1874) and their two daughters. But it looks like they continued to have nice, normal, uneventful lives in the U.S. Tracing distant cousins through English records has been fairly easy.

Ireland


Here are my troublesome recent immigrant ancestors - the ones for whom I have not been able to find an exact place (parish, village, town, city, or county) of birth. While the dates of birth and first appearance in U.S. records for my husband's Callahan ancestors make it quite apparent that they probably immigrated during the time of the famine, my Irish ancestors are harder to pinpoint.

My third great-grandparents, James Cassidy and Mary Ann Livingston, were married 4 May 1869 in Brockton (formerly North Bridgewater), Massachusetts. They lived in Brockton until their deaths in 1901 (James) and 1886 (Mary Ann).

Of course, both James and Mary Ann must have emigrated from Ireland before 1869, but it looks like it was sometime after 1860, since they do not appear in that census.

James was born about 1839 and Mary Ann was born about 1844. The potato blight struck in 1845 and lasted until 1855, so somehow James and Mary Ann managed to make it through it. What brought them to the U.S. after the fact, between 1860 and 1869? Was their family poor or actually doing fine there?

The only thing I know for certain about James and Mary Ann is that they were Catholic. I've done some collateral research on their children, and I have James and Mary Ann's parents' names, but I have yet to get beyond that. Naturally, I wonder what brought them to the U.S. On the upside, Cassidy and Livingston are not among the most common names in Ireland. So this might make figuring out their origins slightly easier. I will have to apply the FAN Club principle to really figure this out, though.

Finally, I have my 4th great-grandfather, Edward Marshall Haley. Edward was born 8 September 1810. While his death record says Dublin, I have yet to confirm that, so I don't take it for granted.

According to a letter written by one of his great-great grandchildren, he was a Protestant from Northern Ireland and went to college in Dublin. Even though he was Protestant, I still checked the rolls of Trinity College, since they were freely available, to ensure he was not a student there.

Per the letter, at one point Edward took the money his family sent him and used it to emigrate to the U.S. I don't know how old he was or when he left Ireland, but I do know he was married in Plymouth, Massachusetts by 5 February 1830 to Clarissa Barrett. They remained in Plympton from 1850 until sometime after 1880, and died in Middleborough.

While I've researched every single one of Edward's 12 children and all their descendants, that has not yielded additional information. Edward's death record gives his parents as Thomas and Mary, but that is all. I do not know if Edward had siblings or any other family members or connections to Ireland in his community in Massachusetts.

A Question of Paternity


These Irish ancestors are on my mother's side of the family, though no Irish shows up in hers or her brother's ethnicity estimates. Why is that, especially considering my father shows a solid 19% Irish in his ethnicity estimate from his great grandmother (good ol' Emma Anna Murphy) and possibly from his great-great grandmother, Sarah Ann Gray (her parents may have been Irish)?

Well, my mother's father's paternity is... iffy. Grandpa Haley's father may or may not have been Herbert Haley.

Of course, we should take DNA test ethnicity estimates with a grain of salt, but I find it interesting that my mother's estimates don't show any Irish whatsoever for her supposed great-great grandparents (James Cassidy and Mary Ann Livingston), at least.

This is one of the reasons we - my mother, maternal uncle (haplogroup R-M269), and their children - have taken DNA tests: to see if we can prove or disprove and then determine my maternal grandfather's parentage.



Copyright (c) 2017 Wendy L. Callahan

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